A Kid’s Guide to Intuition

Many wise people have suggested over the years, that children are more in touch with the intuitive side of things than adults. Children seem to exist in a world full of their imagination; and as they age this tends to dissipate. Of course, adults and parents are concerned that kids know the difference between the truth and imagination. In some ways, their proclivity toward intuition is discouraged by the process called ‘growing up’. Objective realty, if something such as this actually exists, is an agreement between human beings to see the basic properties of things in much the same way. This is the colour red, this is a table, this is a tree … and so on.

A Kid’s Guide to Intuition

In actual fact, we all see these things slightly differently, but sanity (another agreement) calls upon us to disregard the minutiae. Intuition is a non-logical sense of knowing or a premonition that is something is about to occur. Intuition lives on the borderland between imagination and reality. It is a shady half-world of inchoate things and happenings. Children are naturally more inclined to trust their intuitive sides, but the adult world frowns upon this peculiarity. We don’t want our kids to be in possession of any powers beyond our own limitations.

The whole idea of psychic guides – Red Indian Chief’s spirits long departed and Egyptian High Priests in the Temple of isis – are also part imagination and part intuition. They exist inside the minds of psychics and channels in that half-world of possibilities and endings. Perhaps, these gifted folk are at heart, still kids, who never had the magic knocked out of them. Peter Pans and Wendys communicating with Pirate Kings and Lost Boys, who may have a special message for you or me.

A kid’s guide to intuition should be based on an appreciation of the child’s sensitivities. Trusting oneself is, often, a lifetime’s quest. Is that because we disempower our children? Discourage their leaps of faith and put them back in the box too often? Perhaps, humanity needs to trust its children more often. Listen more intently to their fantasies and imaginings. Decipher some pattern or information in the half-light of the intuitive realm. We have named all the streets and towns, rivers, parks and countries. We, as adults, have pricked the balloons of imagination and sent them flaccid to the floor. The world of reality has been ironed flat, etched out in black and white; and we invite our kids to live inside that.